Sunday, February 25, 2007

New Book : Java Data Mining: Strategy, Standard, and Practice: A Practical Guide for architecture, design, and implementation

Java Data Mining: Strategy, Standard, and Practice: A Practical Guide for architecture, design, and implementation
By Mark F. Hornick, Erik Marcadé, Sunil Venkayala

Seems as if books on BI are just like buses. You wait ages for one and then two turn up together. While your on Amazon ordering your copy the Oracle Data Warehousing (see the posting last week) you could also order Mark Hornick’s latest book on Java Data Mining. As you can see from the heading Mark has worked with other key data mining experts to provide a great introduction to not only java data mining but data mining in general.


Both Mark and Sunil work for Oracle in the Server Technologies group and Erik is the founder and current CTO of KXEN. All the authors are well known within the data mining community.



Unfortunately it is not possible to use the usual Amazon feature of looking inside the book online. However, a review on the Amazon.co.uk site indicates this book has excellent content (interestingly, the Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com sites have different reviews of this book. Personally, I find the amazon.co.uk site more useful) . A quick extract from the Amazon.co.uk site:

“Whether you are a software developer, systems architect, data analyst, or business analyst, if you want to take advantage of data mining in the development of advanced analytic applications, Java Data Mining, JDM, the new standard now implemented in core DBMSs and data mining/analysis software, is a key solution component. And this book is the essential guide to the usage of the JDM standard interface. The reference that will help you produce applications with advanced analytics and predictive analytic capabilities. The first and authoritative guide to JDM, written by contributors to the JDM standard”

I have posted a few entries on using data mining in conjunction with multi-dimensional models so I am keen to get started with this book as quickly as possible. As a result, I added this to my list of books that were ordered over weekend from Amazon, along with the Oracle Data Warehousing book. Now I am just waiting for a huge parcel to arrive. I am sure both these books are going to contain a lot of useful information that will find its way on to these pages in one form or another.

You can view the book online using the following link to Amazon.com by clicking here.

And don't forget the Oracle Data Mining blog by Marcos Campos
, which can be viewed here